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Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

Novel Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Toolkit 

 OVERVIEW  | REGULATIONS & GUIDELINES | BEST PRACTICES | INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES | PATIENT RESOURCES  


Overview             

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an illness caused by a virus (more specifically, a coronavirus) called Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). MERS affects the respiratory system (lungs and breathing tubes). Most MERS patients developed severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath. About 3-4 out of every 10 patients reported with MERS have died.

Health officials first reported the disease in Saudi Arabia in September 2012. Through retrospective investigations, health officials later identified that the first known cases of MERS occurred in Jordan in April 2012. So far, all cases of MERS have been linked to countries in and near the Arabian Peninsula.

MERS-CoV has spread from ill people to others through close contact, such as caring for or living with an infected person.
MERS can affect anyone. MERS patients have ranged in age from younger than 1 to 99 years old.

Source: CDC

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Regulations & Guidelines                     

CDC

(1) Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) 

(2) Healthcare Facility Preparedness Checklist

(3) Interim Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Hospitalized Patients with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

WHO

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

MedlinePlus

Coronavirus Infections 

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Best Practices                  
Key Learnings as of February 2016

Healthcare providers should maintain awareness of the need to detect patients who should be evaluated for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection; this requires clinical judgment as information on modes of transmission of MERS-CoV and clinical presentation of MERS is limited and continues to evolve. 

Source: CDC

Related Articles

From MedlinePlus

FAQs

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

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Instructional Resources                  

WHO - MERS-CoV Infographics
Fact Sheets

(1) Related Information for the General Public 

(2) Key Facts

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Patient Resources               
MedlinePlus

Patient Handouts 

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