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5/28/2015 » 5/30/2015
2015 OSAP Symposium

Measles Issue Toolkit

Measles Toolkit

 OVERVIEW  | REGULATIONS & GUIDELINES | BEST PRACTICES | INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES | PATIENT RESOURCES  


Overview             

Measles is an infectious disease caused by a virus. It spreads easily from person to person. The main symptom of measles is an itchy skin rash. The rash often starts on the head and moves down the body. Other symptoms include

·         Fever

·         Cough

·         Runny nose

·         Conjunctivitis (pink eye)

·         Feeling achy and run down

·         Tiny white spots inside the mouth

 

Sometimes measles can lead to serious problems. There is no treatment for measles, but the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine can prevent it.

Source: MedlinePlus

 

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Regulations & Guidelines                     

CDC


(1) Prevention of Measles, Rubella, Congenital Rubella Syndrome, and Mumps, 2013: Summary Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

(2) Immunization of Health-Care Personnel Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

(3) Measles References and Resources

(4) Microneedle Patch for Measles Vaccination Could Be a Game Changer

CDC Health Advisory  - January 23, 2015

US Multi-state Measles Outbreak, December 2014-January 2015

WHO

Immunization surveillance, assessment and monitoring

 

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Best Practices                  
Key Learnings as of January 2015

There is an ongoing measles outbreak linked to an amusement park in California. The CDC recommends that Healthcare providers should ensure that all of their patients are current on MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine. They should consider measles in the differential diagnosis of patients with fever and rash and ask patients about recent international travel or travel to domestic venues frequented by international travelers. They should also ask patients about their history of measles exposures in their community. 

Related Articles

(1) Measles (Rubeola)

(2) Measles: What You Might Not Know

(3) Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Chapter 7: Measles

(4) 106 Degrees: A True Story

FAQs

(1) Frequently Asked Questions about Measles in the US

(2) Measles – For Healthcare Providers

(3) Measles Vaccination

(4) Measles – For Travelers

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Instructional Resources                  
Videos

CDC – Measles Multimedia

Image Library

CDC - Photos of Measles and People with Measles

Fact Sheets

(1) WHO – Measles

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Patient Resources               

 MedlinePlus – Measles

  Measles: Make Sure Your Child Is Fully Immunized

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