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Diseases and Disease Agents 2015
 FAQ - Diseases and Disease Agents - 2015

 

 


My question is what is the protocol for treating patient bites that break skin/have bleeding in the dental setting?

Ask OSAP can provide you with some general references as follows.

The Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis states:

For human bites, the clinical evaluation must include the possibility that both the person bitten and the person who inflicted the bite were exposed to bloodborne pathogens. Transmission of HBV or HIV infection only rarely has been reported by this route (18--20) (CDC, unpublished data, 1998).
1

Additionally, the Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis states as follows:

For human bites, clinical evaluation must include the possibility that both the person bitten and the person who inflicted the bite were exposed to bloodborne pathogens. Transmission of HIV infection by this route has been reported rarely, but not after an occupational exposure (8--12). 2

It should be further noted that OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens Standard references human bites as follows:

Parenteral means piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needlesticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions. 3

You may also find some helpful information in these Internet searches:

human bite protocols
http://www.search.ask.com/web
l=dis&o=100000031cr&qsrc=2869&q=human+bite+protocols&gct
=kwd
 4

osha, human bite
http://www.search.ask.com/web?l=dis&o=100000031cr&qsrc=2869&q=osha%2C+human+bite&gct
=kwd
5

It should be noted that human bites may also be reportable to your local health department, and it is recommended that you consult further with your local health department on this matter.

Resources

1) US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5011a1.htm Accessed on March 16, 2015.

2) US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5409a1.htm Accessed on March 16, 2015.

3) US Department of Labor – Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 1910.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens standard. https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=10051&p_table=STANDARDS Accessed on March 16, 2015.

4) Internet search using the search terms “human bite protocols”.
http://www.search.ask.com/web?l=dis&o=100000031cr&qsrc=2869&q=human+bite+protocols&gct=kwd   Accessed on March 16, 2015.

5) Internet search using the search terms “osha, human bite”.
http://www.search.ask.com/web?l=dis&o=100000031cr&qsrc=2869&q=osha%2C+human+bite&gct=kwd Accessed on March 16, 2015.

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