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Ergonomics Toolkit

Ergonomics Toolkit

 OVERVIEW  | REGULATIONS & GUIDELINES | BEST PRACTICES | INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES | PATIENT RESOURCES  


Overview             

Ergonomics looks at what kind of work you do, what tools you use and your whole job environment. The aim is to find the best fit between you and your job conditions. Examples of ergonomic changes to your work might include:

Adjusting the position of your computer keyboard to prevent carpal tunnel syndrome
Being sure that the height of your desk chair allows your feet to rest flat on floor
Learning the right way to lift heavy objects to prevent back injuries

No matter what the job is, the goal is to make sure that you are safe, comfortable, and less prone to work-related injuries.

 

 

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Regulations & Guidelines                     

OSHA


(1) Ergonomics

(2) Computer Workstations eTool

NIOSH

Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Disorders

MedlinePlus

Ergonomics

 ADA  

Ergonomics and Dental Practice: Preventing work-related musculoskeletal problems

 USAF DECS  Ergonomics and Periodontal Instruments

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Best Practices                  
Key Learnings as of April 2015

Practicing the art of dentistry requires a high degree of concentration and precision. But awkward postures, repetitious hand movements, and persistent vibration to the hand and wrist from a highspeed handpiece can make practitioners vulnerable to musculoskeletal disorders. Consider that many dentists often find themselves in a static, uncomfortable position when treating patients. This sustained position can lead to pain, injury, or, in severe cases of musculoskeletal disorders, disability or early retirement. Source: ADA

Related Articles

Ergonomic challenges

Reports of body pain in a dental student population

Preventing musculoskeletal disorders in clinical dentistry: strategies to address the mechanisms leading to musculoskeletal disorders

Mechanisms leading to musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry 

Dental Hygienists at Risk for CTS

Chicago Midwinter 2015: Good ergonomics can preserve your dental career

Ergonomic Best Practices

FAQs

The hidden pains of dentistry ergonomics: a review

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Instructional Resources                  
Video Dental Clinical Ergonomics 
Fact Sheets

 

 

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Patient Resources               

 MedlinePlus - Ergonomics

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